Kanesha Ariaza

Diabetes Foot Problems

Foot Bunions

Overview
Bunions A bunion (Hallux Abducto Valgus) is sometimes described as a bump on the side of the big toe. However, the visible bump actually reflects changes in the bony framework in the front part of the foot. Instead of pointing straight ahead, the big toe leans towards the second toe, throwing the bones out of alignment and producing the ?bump? of the bunion. Bunions are a progressive disorder and gradually change the angle of the bones in your foot over the years. Symptoms usually occur in the later stages. The skin over the base of your big toe may become red and tender, and make wearing shoes painful. The bigger the bunion gets, the more it hurts to walk. Pressure from your big toe can force your second toe out of alignment, sometimes overlapping your third toe. Severe bunions can make it difficult to walk and you may develop arthritis.

Causes
Bunions can be caused by the following factors. Hereditary (especially via the female line). Rolling in (pronation) of the feet. Walking with turned out feet. Weakness of muscles controlling the big toe. Weakness of intrinsic muscles of the feet. Leaning on the big toe in a tendu, especially to second or derri?re. Reduced mobility of the big toe when on demi-pointe. Restricted pointe range.

Symptoms
Bunions may or may not cause symptoms. A frequent symptom is foot pain in the involved area when walking or wearing shoes that is relieved by resting. A bunion causes enlargement of the base of the big toe and is usually associated with positioning of the big toe toward the smaller toes. This leads to intermittent or chronic pain at the base of the big toe. Bunions that cause marked pain are often associated with swelling of the soft tissues, redness, and local tenderness. It is important to note that, in post-pubertal men and post-menopausal women, pain at the base of the big toe can be caused by gout and gouty arthritis that is similar to the pain caused by bunions.

Diagnosis
Bunions are readily apparent - the prominence is visible at the base of the big toe or side of the foot. However, to fully evaluate the condition, the foot and ankle surgeon may take x-rays to determine the degree of the deformity and assess the changes that have occurred. Because bunions are progressive, they don?t go away, and will usually get worse over time. But not all cases are alike - some bunions progress more rapidly than others. Once your surgeon has evaluated your bunion, a treatment plan can be developed that is suited to your needs.

Non Surgical Treatment
Treatment options vary depending on the severity of your bunion and the amount of pain it causes you. Early treatment is best to decrease your risk of developing joint deformities. Conservative treatment Nonsurgical treatments that may relieve the pain and pressure of a bunion include changing shoes. Wear roomy, comfortable shoes that provide plenty of space for your toes. Padding and taping. Your Podiatrist can help you tape and pad your foot in a normal position. This can reduce stress on the bunion and alleviate your pain.(Obviously pending on footwear selection). Medications. Acetaminophen (Tylenol, others) can control the pain of a bunion. Your doctor may suggest nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others) or naproxen (Aleve), for relieving pain and reducing inflammation. Cortisone injections also can be helpful. But keep in mind that medications do not alleviate the actual cause of the pain. Physical therapy. The heating effect of ultrasound therapy or whirlpool baths can provide relief from the pain and inflammation of a bunion. Orthotics can help control abnormal movement of your foot, reducing your symptoms and preventing your bunion from getting worse. Over-the-counter arch supports can provide relief for some people, though others may require prescription orthotics. Bunions

Surgical Treatment
When these above measures no longer help to relieve the pain in the big toe, surgery to correct the bunion deformity is considered. Numerous surgical procedures have been recommended for bunions. What is most critical is that the type of deformity is carefully evaluated, because one bunion surgery cannot be used for all types of bunions. If the big toe joint is rotated out of place, the joint must be rotated back in place for the procedure to work. Conversely, a bunion can occur with the big toe still ?in place.? If surgery is considered, the bunion must be corrected with the toe joint left in its current position. In other words, one type of bunion repair does not work for everyone. In all types of bunion repairs, ligaments and tendons (soft tissues) around the big toe joint are reconstructed, to allow the toe to be straightened. Most bunion procedures also require cutting the metatarsal bone, which is then fixed with metal screws to hold the bone in position until it heals. It usually takes 2 to 4 months to fully recover from bunion surgery, which is why it is always the last course of treatment.

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